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explore-blog:

Excerpt from a larger infographic guide to getting more out of your Google searches

explore-blog:

Excerpt from a larger infographic guide to getting more out of your Google searches

We all know about the sexual desire of adolescent boys. But scenes of young women’s sexual awakening in themselves do not exist except in a mock-up for the male voyeur. It is hard to imagine, in a cultural vacuum, what solitary female desire looks like. Women’s bodies are portrayed as attractive packaging around an empty box; our genitals are not eroticized for women. men’s bodies are not eroticized for women. Other women’s bodies are not eroticized for women. Female masturbation is not eroticized for women. Each woman has to learn for herself, from nowhere, how to feel sexual (thought she learns constantly how to look sexual). She is given no counterculture of female lust looking outward, no descriptions of the intricate, curious presence of her genital sensations of the way they continually enrich her body’s knowledge. Left to herself in the dark she has very little choice: She must absorb the dominant culture’s fantasies as her own.
The Beauty Myth by Naomi Wolf (via amythia)
The scientist does not study nature because it is useful; he studies it because he delights in it, and he delights in it because it is beautiful. If nature were not beautiful, it would not be worth knowing, and if nature were not worth knowing, life would not be worth living.

French polymath Henri Poincaré, who has previously shared keen insights on how the inventor’s mind works

( It’s Okay To Be Smart)

theatlantic:

How Good Books Can Change You

Summer’s here and time for summer reading at the beach, in a hammock or on the porch. Books are great for passing the time on lazy summer afternoons. And according to Ohio State researchers, the books you read from childhood on can also change who you are.
They do this by a process the researchers called experience taking. More than just understanding a character, it’s taking a little of them inside of you and changing yourself in the process. It’s not something that you plan on, it happens spontaneously. Good writing helps, but there’s much more involved.
Read more. [Image: Alexandre Dulaunoy/Flickr]

theatlantic:

How Good Books Can Change You

Summer’s here and time for summer reading at the beach, in a hammock or on the porch. Books are great for passing the time on lazy summer afternoons. And according to Ohio State researchers, the books you read from childhood on can also change who you are.

They do this by a process the researchers called experience taking. More than just understanding a character, it’s taking a little of them inside of you and changing yourself in the process. It’s not something that you plan on, it happens spontaneously. Good writing helps, but there’s much more involved.

Read more. [Image: Alexandre Dulaunoy/Flickr]

curiositycounts:

In the middle of reading the New York Magazine article, Happy Birthday iPhone: You’re Ruining Everything, I was brought to a screeching halt by a very brief mention of an invented game called “Phonestack”. Phone what?  A brilliant game (some call it social engineering masquerading as a bar game) that I think could completely recivilize dinner and social gatherings. 
Here’s the deal:
1) As you arrive, each person places their phone facedown in the center of the table.
2) As the meal goes on, you’ll hear various texts and emails arriving… and you’ll do absolutely nothing. 
3) You’ll face temptation—maybe even a few involuntary reaches toward the middle of the table—but you’ll be bound by the single, all-important rule of the phone stack. 
Whoever picks up their phone is footing the bill. 
Nothing like a financial incentive to instill etiquette.Bon Appetite!

Genius.

curiositycounts:

In the middle of reading the New York Magazine article, Happy Birthday iPhone: You’re Ruining Everything, I was brought to a screeching halt by a very brief mention of an invented game called “Phonestack”. Phone what?  A brilliant game (some call it social engineering masquerading as a bar game) that I think could completely recivilize dinner and social gatherings. 

Here’s the deal:

1) As you arrive, each person places their phone facedown in the center of the table.

2) As the meal goes on, you’ll hear various texts and emails arriving… and you’ll do absolutely nothing. 

3) You’ll face temptation—maybe even a few involuntary reaches toward the middle of the table—but you’ll be bound by the single, all-important rule of the phone stack.
 

Whoever picks up their phone is footing the bill. 

Nothing like a financial incentive to instill etiquette.
Bon Appetite!

Genius.

In scientific inquiry, often the answer to one simple question fortuitously explains the answers to many others; they may even answer questions that have yet to be conceived. Powerful ideas unify concepts or phenomena that were previously thought to be unrelated.

If you can sustain your interest in what you’re doing, you’re an extremely fortunate person. What you see very frequently in people’s professional lives, and perhaps in their emotional life as well, is that they lose interest in the third act. You sort of get tired, and indifferent, and, sometimes, defensive. And you kind of lose your capacity for astonishment — and that’s a great loss, because the world is a very astonishing place.

What I feel fortunate about is that I’m still astonished, that things still amaze me. And I think that’s the great benefit of being in the arts, where the possibility for learning never disappears, where you basically have to admit you never learn it.

Milton Glaser, considered by many the greatest graphic designer alive and celebrating his 83rd birthday today, on art, purpose, and the capacity for astonishment.
I want to be with those who know secret things
or else alone.
Rainer Maria Rilke, from A Book for the Hours of Prayer, trans. Robert Bly